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Franklin man sentenced to 13 years for heroin, cocaine sales

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Franklin County deputies say the heroin, cocaine, marijuana, handgun and cash shown in this evidence photo was seized during a Nov. 19, 2018, raid on Michael Jermaine Jackson's home on Wiley Road west of Spring Hope. Contributed photo
Franklin County deputies say the heroin, cocaine, marijuana, handgun and cash shown in this evidence photo was seized during a Nov. 19, 2018, raid on Michael Jermaine Jackson's home on Wiley Road west of Spring Hope. Contributed photo
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NEW BERN — A Franklin County man was sentenced Wednesday to more than 13 years in federal prison after being convicted of selling heroin, fentanyl and cocaine.

Michael Jermaine Jackson, 35, also trafficked in marijuana and had a gun, ammunition and drug paraphernalia in his home when deputies searched it in 2018, according to federal prosecutors. Jackson had been released from a state prison earlier that year, where he had served a felony assault charge.

The Franklin County Sheriff’s Office began investigating Jackson in September 2018, authorities said. The sheriff’s office said after a number of undercover buys, narcotics investigators searched Jackson’s home in Spring Hope and seized more than $21,000 worth of drugs.

The U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives assisted investigators.

Jackson was indicted in April 2019 on charges of possession with intent to distribute heroin, fentanyl, crack cocaine, cocaine, and marijuana; possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of distributing a controlled substance; and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon.

He pleaded guilty to the charges in October, according to a press release from the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Eastern District of North Carolina.

U.S. District Judge Louise W. Flanagan sentenced Jackson last week to 160 months, followed by five years of supervised release.

The release said the prosecution was part of Project Safe Neighborhood, a program aimed at reducing violent crime, and the Take Back North Carolina Initiative, a partnership with law enforcement and district attorneys to reduce drug trafficking and crimes against police.