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The United States government is violating human rights with its treatment of immigrants trying to enter the states and apply for citizenship.

Whether people like it or not, immigrants, children and adults alike, are being held in horrific conditions comparable to concentration camps. American society is becoming more aggressive toward people who have immigrated to the states rather than more accepting. The president’s encouragement of the mistreatment of immigrants is becoming normalized and commonplace rather than being protested against.

Due to the unfair restrictions on immigration, the American people should vote for change, bring the issues to the Judicial Branch for a civil dispute, protest the actions of the federal government and help to create a different image of immigrants as they are viewed now.

Since the beginning of Donald Trump’s campaign, the president has been quite open with his opinion toward immigrants, specifically those migrating from Central America and the Middle East, stereotyping them all as terrorists and rapists rather than people just trying to start over in the “land of the free.” His rhetoric against immigrants is validated by some people who believe that immigrants are coming to America illegally, stealing American jobs and tax money, and are all made up of drug dealers, terrorists and rapists, who could do no good. However, even undocumented immigrants are paying taxes and helping the American economy rather than destroying it as many Trump supporters claim.

The United States was founded on the idea of freedom, life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. These are basic human rights outlined in the U.S. Constitution, yet these rights are being denied to immigrants based on stereotypes. With the new immigration system, immigrants are kicked out or put through a torturous process, ripping apart the original purpose of America. Some Americans believe that those who work for their families, pay their taxes, and do the jobs that no one else will, should have the right to try and become a U.S. citizen and live out their interpretation of the American dream. Even still, these people are cast out and discriminated against because of one thing: they are not born here.

Raeanna Fitzgerald and Liam Nicholas are students in Cherilyn Murray’s English IV class at North Wake College and Career Academy in Wake Forest. This column is the first of three written by students in Murray’s class which will be published on this opinion page.

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